Look Mom, No Hands! Test Driving Code Without A Mocking Framework

I love TDD. I haven’t found a more effective way to incrementally design and build software in the 15+ years that I’ve been doing this. I have formed and evolved a lot of opinions about how I approach TDD, though.

Recently, I wrote a post for EuroStar Software Testing titled Look Mom, No Hands! Test Driving Code Without A Mocking Framework

This is a topic that has been on my mind for a long time. It’s not intended to start a mocks vs stubs flamewar or anything like that. Instead, I wanted to walk through my progression of TDD practices over the years and share what I’ve learned.

Don’t get me wrong – test-driving with a mocking framework is better than not test-driving at all. I just prefer stubs.

Looking back at the test cases in the Booked source code which utilize PHPUnit’s mocking framework (yes, there are still a lot), I can see just how entangled the test code is with the implementation of the production code. The source for Booked changes frequently and it is covered by more than 1000 unit tests. New features are introduced and, occasionally, some of the unrelated tests fail.

They fail because there is too much specified in the mock setup. In order to validate the behavior of some area of the code, I have to set up unrelated mock expectations to get collaborating objects to return usable data. If I change the implementation of an object to no longer use that data, my test shouldn’t fail.

A couple of years ago I stopped using PHPUnit’s mock objects and I’ve seen the resiliency of my unit test suite increase. I’ve also seen my development speed and design quality improve. Instead of ambiguous mock expectations scattered throughout the tests, I’ve built up a library of stub objects which have logical default behavior.

When test-driving increments of functionality, I’m able to concentrate on the behavior that I need to implement rather than getting distracted with test setup and management.

More focus. Better design. Higher quality. No mocks.

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